Direct Reference Theory

A direct reference theory is a theory of meaning that claims that the meaning of an expression lies in what it points out in the world. It stands in contrast to mediated reference theories.

Read more about Direct Reference TheoryJohn Stuart Mill, Ruth Barcan Marcus, Saul Kripke

Other articles related to "reference, direct reference theory":

Reference Dose - Types
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GRS 80 - Geodesy
... The geometrical separation between it and the reference ellipsoid is called the geoidal undulation ... A reference ellipsoid, customarily chosen to be the same size (volume) as the geoid, is described by its semi-major axis (equatorial radius) a and flattening f ... The 1980 Geodetic Reference System (GRS 80) posited a 378. 137m semi-major axis and a 1/298.257 101 ... flattening ...
Direct Reference Theory - Saul Kripke
... Saul Kripke defended direct reference theory when applied to proper names ... Kripke claims that proper names do not have any "senses" at all, because senses only offer contingent facts about things ...
Encyclopedia Of Public Health
... The Encyclopedia of Public Health is a reference set of four volumes covering all aspects of public health for the lay reader ... It has received the CHOICE 2002 award for Outstanding Academic Reference Title and has been listed in the Booklist/Reference Book Bulletin Editor's Choice of Outstanding Reference titles ...

Famous quotes containing the words theory, direct and/or reference:

    every subjective phenomenon is essentially connected with a single point of view, and it seems inevitable that an objective, physical theory will abandon that point of view.
    Thomas Nagel (b. 1938)

    The most passionate, consistent, extreme and implacable enemy of the Enlightenment and ... all forms of rationalism ... was Johann Georg Hamann. His influence, direct and indirect, upon the romantic revolt against universalism and scientific method ... was considerable and perhaps crucial.
    Isaiah Berlin (b. 1909)

    Meaning is what essence becomes when it is divorced from the object of reference and wedded to the word.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)