Degree

Degree may refer to:

Read more about Degree:  As A Unit of Measurement, In Mathematics, In Education, Other Measures, Other Uses

Other articles related to "degree, degrees":

Aleksander Kwaśniewski - 1995–2005: Presidency - Degree
... In his candidate for presidency statement Kwaśniewski declared that he had graduated university studies ... Actually he had never written his master thesis, nor passed the university final exams and therefore had no master degree ...
Vladimir May-Mayevsky - Honors
... Stanislaus 3rd degree, 1900 Order of St ... Anne 3rd degree 1904 Order of St ... Stanislaus 2nd degree, 1906 Order of St ...
Elliott Wave Principle - Degree
... wave structures of increasing size or higher degree ... This signals that the movement of the wave one degree higher is upward ... to the five and three-wave structure which it underlies one degree higher ...
Yamashita Yoshiaki - Early Years
... He advanced to first degree black belt (shodan) rank in three months, fourth degree (yondan) ranking in two years, and sixth degree (rokudan) in fourteen years ...
Education In Sweden - Higher Education - Advanced Level (avancerad Nivå)
... advanced level, a student must have obtained a 3-year Swedish degree at the basic level or a corresponding degree from another country or some corresponding qualification ... The degrees that can be obtained at the advanced level are Degree of Master (One year) (magisterexamen), 1 year, 60 higher education credits Degree of Master (Two ... The Degree of Master (Two years), masterexamen, is a new degree that is intended to be closely linked to continuing education at the graduate level ...

Famous quotes containing the word degree:

    Never before has a civilization reached such a degree of a contempt for life; never before has a generation, drowned in mortification, felt such a rage to live.
    Raoul Vaneigem (b. 1934)

    One who shows signs of mental aberration is, inevitably, perhaps, but cruelly, shut off from familiar, thoughtless intercourse, partly excommunicated; his isolation is unwittingly proclaimed to him on every countenance by curiosity, indifference, aversion, or pity, and in so far as he is human enough to need free and equal communication and feel the lack of it, he suffers pain and loss of a kind and degree which others can only faintly imagine, and for the most part ignore.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864–1929)

    I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)