County

A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposes in certain modern nations. Its etymology derives from the Old French term, conté or cunté and could denote a jurisdiction in mainland Europe, under the sovereignty of a count (earl) or a viscount. The modern French is comté, and its equivalents in other languages are contea, contado, comtat, condado, Grafschaft, Gau, etc.) (cf. conte, comte, conde, Graf).

When the Normans conquered England, they brought the term with them. The Saxons had already established the regions that became the Historic counties of England calling them shires. The Vikings introduced the term earl (from Old Norse, jarl) to the British Isles. Thus, "earl" and "earldom" were taken as equivalent to the continental use of "count" and "county". So, the later-imported term became a synonym for the native English word scir or, in Modern English, shire

Since a shire was an administrative division of the kingdom, the term "county" evolved to designate an administrative division of national government in most modern uses.

A county may be further subdivided into townships or other administrative jurisdictions under the county's control. The boundaries of a county usually, but not always, contain cities, villages, towns, townships or other municipal corporations. Depending on the particular nation, municipalities might or might not be subject to direct or indirect county control.

In the United Kingdom, many county names derive from the name of the county town with the word "shire" added on: for example, Gloucester, in Gloucestershire; Worcester, in Worcestershire.

Outside the Anglophone community of nations, the term "county" is often used to describe sub-national jurisdictions that are structurally equivalent to counties in the relationship they have with their national government; but which may or may not be operationally equivalent to the county as that entity is known in predominantly English-speaking countries.

Read more about County:  Australia, Canada, China (People's Republic), Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Iran, Ireland, Italy, Liberia, Lithuania, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Romania, Sweden, Republic of China (Taiwan), Korea, United Kingdom, United States

Other articles related to "county":

Västra Götaland County - Heraldry
... The arms for the County of Västra Götaland was granted in 1999 when the county was formed ...
Orange County, California - Geography - Adjacent Counties
... Los Angeles County, California—north, west San Bernardino County, California—northeast Riverside County, California—east San Diego County ...
Västra Götaland County
... Västra Götaland County (Swedish Västra Götalands län) is a county or län on the western coast of Sweden ... The county is the second largest (in terms of population) of Sweden's counties and it is subdivided into 49 municipalities (kommuner) ... The capital and governmental seat of Västra Götaland County is Gothenburg ...
Västra Götaland County - Politics
... The Västra Götaland Regional Council or Västra Götalandsregionen is an evolved County Council that for a trial period has assumed certain tasks from the County Administrative Board ... trial councils are applied for Skåne County and Gotland County ...
Van Buren County, Iowa - Geography - Adjacent Counties
... Jefferson County (north) Henry County (northeast) Lee County (east) Clark County, Missouri (southeast) Scotland County, Missouri (southwest) Davis County (west) ...

Famous quotes containing the word county:

    Hold hard, my county darlings, for a hawk descends,
    Golden Glamorgan straightens, to the falling birds.
    Your sport is summer as the spring runs angrily.
    Dylan Thomas (1914–1953)

    Don’t you know there are 200 temperance women in this county who control 200 votes. Why does a woman work for temperance? Because she’s tired of liftin’ that besotted mate of hers off the floor every Saturday night and puttin’ him on the sofa so he won’t catch cold. Tonight we’re for temperance. Help yourself to them cloves and chew them, chew them hard. We’re goin’ to that festival tonight smelling like a hot mince pie.
    Laurence Stallings (1894–1968)

    Jack: A politician, huh?
    Editor: Oh, county treasurer or something like that.
    Jack: What’s so special about him?
    Editor: They say he’s an honest man.
    Robert Rossen (1908–1966)