Competition - Literature


Literary competitions, such as contests sponsored by literary journals, publishing houses and theaters, have increasingly become a means for aspiring writers to gain recognition. Prestigious awards for fiction include those sponsored by the Missouri Review, Boston Review, Indiana Review, North American Review and Southwest Review. The Albee Award, sponsored by the Yale Drama Series, is among the most prestigious playwriting awards. Some American writers, such as Gina Ochsner and Jacob Appel, have gained prominence specifically for their active participation in numerous literary competitions.

Charging fees for literary competitions is extremely controversial. Some writers view fees as a form of exploitation that takes advantage of aspiring authors and playwrights. However, fee-based contests also have strong supporters who argue that these competitions offer rare opportunities for young writers to have their voices heard at a time when access to major agents and editors has grown increasingly limited.

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Other articles related to "literature":

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Famous quotes containing the word literature:

    I am not fooling myself with dreams of immortality, know how relative all literature is, don’t have any faith in mankind, derive enjoyment from too few things. Sometimes these crises give birth to something worth while, sometimes they simply plunge one deeper into depression, but, of course, it is all part of the same thing.
    Stefan Zweig (18811942)

    The cinema is not an art which films life: the cinema is something between art and life. Unlike painting and literature, the cinema both gives to life and takes from it, and I try to render this concept in my films. Literature and painting both exist as art from the very start; the cinema doesn’t.
    Jean-Luc Godard (b. 1930)

    ...I have come to make distinctions between what I call the academy and literature, the moral equivalents of church and God. The academy may lie, but literature tries to tell the truth.
    Dorothy Allison (b. 1949)