Australian and New Zealand Army Corps

The Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) was a First World War army corps of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force that was formed in Egypt in 1915 and operated during the Battle of Gallipoli. General William Birdwood commanded the corps, which comprised troops from the First Australian Imperial Force and 1st New Zealand Expeditionary Force. The corps was disbanded in 1916 following the Allied evacuation of the Gallipoli peninsula and the formation of I Anzac Corps and II Anzac Corps.

Read more about Australian And New Zealand Army CorpsFormation of ANZAC, Later Formations of ANZAC

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anzac" class="article_title_2">Australian And New Zealand Army Corps - Later Formations of ANZAC
... Following the evacuation of Gallipoli in November 1915, the Australian and New Zealand units reassembled in Egypt ... The New Zealand contingent expanded to form their own division the New Zealand Division ... The First Australian Imperial Force underwent a major reorganisation resulting in the formation of two new divisions the 4th and 5th divisions ...

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