Who is Tristan Tzara?

  • (noun): French poet (born in Romania) who was one of the cofounders of the Dada movement (1896-1963).
    Synonyms: Tzara, Samuel Rosenstock

Tristan Tzara

Tristan Tzara (; ; born Samuel or Samy Rosenstock, also known as S. Samyro; April 16 1896 – December 25, 1963) was a Romanian and French avant-garde poet, essayist and performance artist. Also active as a journalist, playwright, literary and art critic, composer and film director, he was known best for being one of the founders and central figures of the anti-establishment Dada movement. Under the influence of Adrian Maniu, the adolescent Tzara became interested in Symbolism and co-founded the magazine Simbolul with Ion Vinea (with whom he also wrote experimental poetry) and painter Marcel Janco. During World War I, after briefly collaborating on Vinea's Chemarea, he joined Janco in Switzerland. There, Tzara's shows at the Cabaret Voltaire and Zunfthaus zur Waag, as well as his poetry and art manifestos, became a main feature of early Dadaism. His work represented Dada's nihilistic side, in contrast with the more moderate approach favored by Hugo Ball.

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Some articles on Tristan Tzara:

Tristan Tzara - Legacy - Posthumous Controversies
... The many polemics which surrounded Tzara in his lifetime left traces after his death, and determine contemporary perceptions of his work ... The controversy regarding Tzara's role as a founder of Dada extended into several milieus, and continued long after the writer died ... Richter, who discusses the lengthy conflict between Huelsenbeck and Tzara over the issue of Dada foundation, speaks of the movement as being torn apart by "petty ...

Famous quotes containing the words tristan tzara and/or tzara:

    Dada doubts everything. Dada is an armadillo. Everything is Dada, too. Beware of Dada. Anti-dadaism is a disease: selfkleptomania, man’s normal condition, is Dada. But the real dadas are against Dada.
    Tristan Tzara (1896–1963)

    The rest, called literature, is a dossier of human imbecility for the guidance of future professors.
    —Tristan Tzara (1896–1963)