Wheatstone Bridge

A Wheatstone bridge is an electrical circuit used to measure an unknown electrical resistance by balancing two legs of a bridge circuit, one leg of which includes the unknown component. Its operation is similar to the original potentiometer. It was invented by Samuel Hunter Christie in 1833 and improved and popularized by Sir Charles Wheatstone in 1843. One of the Wheatstone bridge's initial uses was for the purpose of soils analysis and comparison.

Read more about Wheatstone BridgeOperation, Derivation, Significance, Modifications of The Fundamental Bridge

Other articles related to "wheatstone bridge, bridge, wheatstone":

Strain Gauge - Gauges in Practice - Variations in Temperature
... The dummy gauge is wired into a Wheatstone bridge on an adjacent arm to the active gauge so that the temperature effects on the active and dummy gauges cancel each other ... Law was originally coined in response to a set of gauges being incorrectly wired into a Wheatstone bridge.) Temperature effects on the lead wires can be cancelled by using a "3-wire bridge" or a "4-wire ohm circuit ... it is a good engineering practice to keep the Wheatstone bridge voltage drive low enough to avoid the self heating of the strain gauge ...
Charles Wheatstone - Wheatstone Bridge
... In 1843 Wheatstone communicated an important paper to the Royal Society, entitled 'An Account of Several New Processes for Determining the Constants of a Voltaic ... The method was neglected until Wheatstone brought it into notice ... were given by the strokes of a bell, was also patented by Cooke and Wheatstone in May of that year ...
Wheatstone Bridge - Modifications of The Fundamental Bridge
... The Wheatstone bridge is the fundamental bridge, but there are other modifications that can be made to measure various kinds of resistances when the fundamental Wheatstone bridge is not suitable ... Some of the modifications are Carey Foster bridge, for measuring small resistances Kelvin Varley Slide Kelvin bridge Maxwell bridge ...

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