University of Michigan Men's Glee Club

The University of Michigan Men's Glee Club is an all-male glee club (or choir) at the University of Michigan currently conducted by Eugene Rogers. With roots tracing back to 1859, it is the second oldest glee club in the United States and is the oldest student organization at the University. The group is composed of about 100 singers from several of the schools and colleges at the University of Michigan. They perform repertoire ranging from music of the Renaissance to African-American spirituals.

Read more about University Of Michigan Men's Glee ClubDirectors and Terms, Subsets and A Cappella Groups, Notable Alumni, International Tours, Discography

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