Succeeds

Some articles on succeeds:

Conservative Government 1970–1974 - Cabinet - June 1970 – March 1974 - Changes
... Geoffrey Rippon succeeds Barber as Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster ... John Davies succeeds Rippon as Secretary for Technology ... March 1972 – Robert Carr succeeds William Whitelaw as Lord President and Leader of the House of Commons ...
Conservative Government 1987-1990 - Cabinets - July 1989 - November 1990 - Changes
... October 1989 John Major succeeds Nigel Lawson as Chancellor of the Exchequer ... Douglas Hurd succeeds John Major as Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs ... David Waddington succeeds Douglas Hurd as Secretary of State for the Home Department ...
Second National Government 1931–1935 - Cabinet - November 1931 – May 1935 - Changes
... June 1932 - Lord Irwin** succeeds Sir Donald Maclean (deceased) as President of the Board of Education September 1932 – Stanley Baldwin succeeds Lord Snowden as Lord Privy Seal ... Sir John Gilmour succeeds Sir Herbert Samuel as Home Secretary ... Sir Godfrey Collins**** succeeds Sir Archibald Sinclair as Scottish Secretary ...
Conservative Government 1955–1957 - The Cabinet - Changes
... December 1955 Rab Butler succeeds Harry Crookshank as Lord Privy Seal and Leader of the House of Commons ... Harold Macmillan succeeds Butler as Chancellor of the Exchequer ... Selwyn Lloyd succeeds Macmillan as Foreign Secretary ...
Conservative Government 1979-1983 - Cabinets - September 1981 – June 1983 - Changes
... April 1982 Francis Pym succeeds Lord Carrington as Foreign Secretary ... John Biffen succeeds Pym as Lord President of the Council ... Baroness Young succeeds Humphrey Atkins as Lord Privy Seal ...

Famous quotes containing the word succeeds:

    Invention flags, his brain goes muddy,
    And black despair succeeds brown study.
    William Congreve (1670–1729)

    Man, “poor player,” succeeds better in life’s tragedy than comedy.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    Moderation is a fatal thing.... Nothing succeeds like excess.
    Oscar Wilde (1854–1900)