Sixth Form College - England

England

The 1st comprehensive intake sixth form colleges in England were established at the end of the 1960s and have since proved popular with students, their parents, and other groups in the community. Until 1992, these colleges were controlled and funded by local education authorities (LEAs), but the Further and Higher Education Act, 1992 transferred all institutions within the sector to the Further Education Funding Council for England (FEFC), a national agency with strategic responsibility for the operation of general further education (FE) colleges. Later the FEFC's functions were taken over by the Learning and Skills Council (LSC), a reorganisation that included changes in the funding and supervision of sixth form colleges. Sixth form colleges take responsibility for their own employment, pensions and pay arrangements with the support and advice of the Sixth Form College Forum (SFCF). The Forum is made up of representative principals from SFCs across the UK. The Forum or Council, sets up several Committees to deliver its range of support services for SFCs as well as facilitating lobbying work with Central Government. Colleges for the most part do not charge full-time daytime students; however, adult students (most of whom attend evening classes) may have to pay a fee (for examinations, tutors' time and other costs). There are also some sixth form colleges in the independent sector, specialising in A levels for which fees are paid.-these are unconnected with the Council or the Forum.

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Famous quotes containing the word england:

    Our king went forth to Normandy,
    With grace and might of chivalry,
    The God for him wrought marvellously,
    Wherefore England may call and cry
    Deo gratias, Deo gratias Anglia
    Redde pro victoria.
    Unknown. The Agincourt Carol (l. 1–6)