Rule - Science

Science

  • Norm (sociology), a term in sociology describing explicit or implicit rules used within society or by a group (i.e. social norms)
  • Rule of inference or transformation rule, a term in logic for a function which takes premises and returns a conclusion
  • "Rule X" elementary cellular automaton, where X is a number between 0-255 characterizing a specific model (e.g. Rule 110)
  • Ruler, or "rule"; a distance measuring device

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Other articles related to "science":

J. Robert Oppenheimer - Final Years
... become the World Academy of Art and Science in 1960 ... attend the first Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs in 1957 ... stressed the difficulty of managing the power of knowledge in a world in which the freedom of science to exchange ideas was more and more hobbled by political concerns ...
Vannevar Bush Award
... The National Science Board established the Vannevar Bush Award (/væˈniːvər/ van-NEE-vər) in 1980 to honor Dr ... The annual award recognizes an individual who, through public service activities in science and technology, has made an outstanding "contribution toward the welfare of ... to Presidents, and the force behind the establishment of the National Science Foundation ...
Science and Society - Political Usage
... See also Politicization of science Many issues damage the relationship of science to the media and the use of science and scientific arguments by politicians ... or think tank makes it their only goal to cast doubt on supported science because it conflicts with political agendas ...
Vannevar Bush
1890 – June 28, 1974) was an American engineer, inventor and science administrator known for his work on analog computers, for his role as an initiator and administrator of the ... coordinated the activities of some six thousand leading American scientists in the application of science to warfare ... and public intellectual during World War II, when he was in effect the first presidential science advisor ...

Famous quotes containing the word science:

    I exulted like “a pagan suckled in a creed” that had never been worn at all, but was brand-new, and adequate to the occasion. I let science slide, and rejoiced in that light as if it had been a fellow creature. I saw that it was excellent, and was very glad to know that it was so cheap. A scientific explanation, as it is called, would have been altogether out of place there. That is for pale daylight.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Curiosity engenders both science and scandal.
    Mason Cooley (b. 1927)

    In our science and philosophy, even, there is commonly no true and absolute account of things. The spirit of sect and bigotry has planted its hoof amid the stars. You have only to discuss the problem, whether the stars are inhabited or not, in order to discover it.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)