Right To Know

"Right to know", in the context of United States workplace and community environmental law, is the legal principle that the individual has the right to know the chemicals to which they may be exposed in their daily living. It is embodied in federal law in the United States as well as in local laws in several states. "Right to Know" laws take two forms: Community Right to Know and Workplace Right to Know. Each grants certain rights to those groups. The "right to know" was a movement made popular by Rachel Carson with her book Silent Spring.

Environmental illness share characteristics with common diseases. For example, cyanide exposure symptoms include weakness, headache, nausea, confusion, dizziness, seizures, cardiac arrest, and unconsciousness. Influenza and heart disease include the same symptoms. Cyanide is one of the most toxic substances known to man. Failure to obtain proper disclosure is likely to lead to improper or ineffective medical diagnosis and treatment. This can contribute to prolonged illness and death.

Read more about Right To Know:  Australia, Canada, Europe, United States, Past and Future of Right To Know

Other articles related to "right to know, to, right":

Clive Ponting - Right To Know
... serious questions about the validity of the 1911 Official Secrets Act and the public's "right to know" ... Shortly after his resignation on 16 February 1985, The Observer began to serialize Ponting's book The Right to Know the inside story of the Belgrano affair ... Before the trial, a jury could take the view that if an action could be seen to be in the public interest, that might justify the right of the individual to take that action ...
Past and Future of Right To Know
... Many urged to find out the cause of this disaster and to conclude upon the reason, it was due to the neglect of the plant ... and knowledge in the community about the dangers ultimately led to this disaster which could have been avoided ... Shortly after, the Emergency Planning and Right to Know Act of 1986, originally introduced by California Democrat Henry Waxman, was passed ...

Famous quotes containing the words right to and/or right:

    What does it matter whether I am shown to be right! I am right too much!—And he who laughs best today will also laugh last.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)

    What does it matter whether I am shown to be right! I am right too much!—And he who laughs best today will also laugh last.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)