Prohibited Degree of Kinship

In law, a prohibited degree of kinship refers to a degree of consanguinity (blood relatedness) between persons that results in certain actions between them becoming illegal. Two major examples of prohibited degrees are found in incest and nepotism. Incest refers to sexual relations and marriage between closely related individuals; nepotism is the preference of blood-relations in the distribution of a rank or office.

An incest taboo against relations between mother and son is a cultural universal. Taboos against sexual relations between individuals of other degrees of close relationship vary between the world's cultures, but stigmatization of unions with full siblings and with direct descendants are widespread.

One example of criminalization of nepotism is in the US state of Texas, which restricts the appointment or hiring of relatives by public officials.

Read more about Prohibited Degree Of Kinship:  Marital Prohibitions, Jury Service, See Also

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