Octane Rating

Octane rating or octane number is a standard measure of the performance of a motor or aviation fuel. The higher the octane number, the more compression the fuel can withstand before detonating. In broad terms, fuels with a higher octane rating are used in high-compression engines that generally have higher performance. In contrast, fuels with low octane numbers (but high cetane numbers) are ideal for diesel engines. Use of gasolines with low octane numbers may lead to the problem of engine knocking.

Read more about Octane RatingPrinciples, Examples of Octane Ratings, Effects of Octane Rating, Regional Variations

Other articles related to "octane rating, octane ratings, rating, octane":

Octane Rating - Regional Variations
... The selection of octane ratings available at the pump can vary greatly from region to region ... In limited areas higher rating such as 99 RON is available ... Egypt 80 RON is commonly used for all taxis and old cars and is the predominant rating in rural areas ...
Superchargers - Aircraft - Effects of Fuel Octane Rating
... Until World War II all automobile and aviation fuel was generally rated at 87 octane or less ... This is the rating that was achieved by the simple distillation of "light crude" oil ... Octane rating boosting through additives was a line of research being explored at the time ...
Butanol Fuel - Properties of Common Fuels - Octane Rating
... The octane rating of n-butanol is similar to that of gasoline but lower than that of ethanol and methanol ... n-Butanol has a RON (Research Octane number) of 96 and a MON (Motor octane number) of 78 (with a resulting "(R+M)/2 pump octane number" of 87, as used in North America) while t-butanol has octane ratings ... A fuel with a higher octane rating is less prone to knocking (extremely rapid and spontaneous combustion by compression) and the control system of any modern car ...
Coleman Fuel
... Coleman fuel is a mixture of cyclohexane, nonane, octane, heptane, and pentane ... Though Coleman fuel has an octane rating of 50 to 55 and a flammability similar to gasoline, it has none of the additives found in modern gasoline and cannot be used as a substitute for gasoline ... Its high combustion temperature and lack of octane boosting additives like tetraethyllead will destroy engine valves, and its low octane rating would produce ...
Liquid Fuels - Petroleum - Gasoline
... Gasoline sold in most countries carries a published octane rating ... The octane number is an empirical measure of the resistance of gasoline to combusting prematurely, known as knocking ... The higher the octane rating, the more resistant the fuel is to autoignition under high pressures, which allows for a higher compression ratio ...