Mungaru Male - in Other Languages

In Other Languages

The remake rights of Mungaru Male were acquired by Mr Suryaprakash Rao of SPR Entertainers India Private Limited for Rs. 1.5 crores for both the Tamil-language and the Telugu-language versions. The Telugu-language version was released in 2008 as Vaana, meaning rain. It was remade in Bengali language as Premer Kahini. Boney Kapoor is planning to remake the film in Hindi starring either Imran Khan or Ranbir Kapoor.

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    The very natural tendency to use terms derived from traditional grammar like verb, noun, adjective, passive voice, in describing languages outside of Indo-European is fraught with grave possibilities of misunderstanding.
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