Maggid

Maggid (Hebrew: מַגִּיד), sometimes spelled as magid, is a traditional Eastern European Jewish religious itinerant preacher, skilled as a narrator of Torah and religious stories. A preacher of the more scholarly sort was called a "darshan", and usually occupied the official position of rabbi. The title of "maggid mesharim" (= "a preacher of uprightness"; abbreviated מ"מ) probably dates from the sixteenth century.

There always have been two distinct classes of leaders in Israel—the scholar and rabbi, and the preacher or maggid. That the popular prophet was sometimes called "maggid" is maintained by those who translate מַגִּיד מִשְׁנֶה (maggid mishne) Zecharia 9:12, by "the maggid repeats" (Löwy, "Beqoret ha-Talmud," p. 50). Like the Greek sophists, the early maggidim based their preaching on questions addressed to them by the multitude. Thus the Pesiqta, the first collection of set speeches, usually begins with "yelammedenu rabbenu" (= "let our master teach us"). An excellent example is the Passover Haggadah, which is introduced by four questions; the reciter of the answer is called "maggid." When there were no questions the maggid chose a Biblical text, which was called the "petichah" (opening).

Read more about Maggid:  Popularity of The Maggid, In The Gaonic Period and The Middle Ages, Relation To Messianic Fervour, Motivation and Admonishment, The Dubner Maggid, Philosophical Maggidim, Hasidic Maggidim, Notable Maggidim

Other articles related to "maggid":

Hillel Noah Maggid
... Hillel Noah Maggid (1829-1903) (also known as Hillel Sternschneider) was a Russian-Jewish genealogist and historian ... Having lost his father at the age of eighteen, Maggid learned the calling of a lapidary, but not content with cutting epitaphs on tombstones and monuments, he occasionally composed inscriptions ... Maggid also collaborated with Fuenn in the latter's history of the Jewish community of Vilna ("Ḳiryah Ne'emanah") ...
Maggid Shiur
... The term Maggid Shiur literarly translates from Hebrew to mean "sayer of Shiur" ... A Maggid Shiur is generally a Rabbi who lectures on advanced and in-depth Talmudic studies ... The stature of a Maggid Shiur is generally a much sought after position by the typical Yeshiva student ...
Elimelech Of Lizhensk - Biography - Hasidic Leadership
... After the death of the Maggid of Mezeritch, the Hasidic movement avoided one centralised leader, as had characterised it under the Baal Shem Tov and the Maggid ... Instead the great leadership of students of the Maggid dispersed across Eastern Europe, from Poland to Russia, taking with them their different interpretations of Hasidic ... third generation, Rabbi Elimelech was considered by most of the Maggid's students and followers as his successor ...
Notable Maggidim
... Hillel Noah Maggid (Steinschneider), Lithuanian genealogist and historian, a descendant of the family of Saul Wahl Glusker Maggid, see also Abba Glusk Leczeka, a poem by Adalbert von. 1997), the "Maggid of Jerusalem" Tzvi Hirsch Masliansky, American preacher The Kozhnitser (Kozienizer) Magid Yisroel Hopsztajn (c. 1733 - 1814), the "Maggid of Kozhnitz" and one of the three "patriarchs" of Polish Hasidism ...
Sholom Schwadron - Relationship With The Krohns
... conventions, and other assemblies, solidifying his title of "Maggid" ... Schwadron's encouragement and active input, Rabbi Paysach Krohn penned the first of his popular "Maggid" books, The Maggid Speaks, published in 1987 ... Subsequent titles (Along the Maggid's Journey, In the Footsteps of the Maggid) memorialized Schwadron's influence on the overall project ...