Lonesome Ghosts - Plot

Plot

The Ajax Ghost Exterminators are hired by telephone to drive out four ghosts from a haunted house that has long been abandoned. Unbeknownst to them, they were hired by the ghosts themselves, who are bored because nobody has visited the house they had long been haunting (they had scared all the locals away, as one ghost puts it: "Guess we're too good!"). They wish to play tricks on the living, and do so through a series of inventive, annoying pranks. The exterminators arrive, enter and announce themselves, but there is nobody to receive them. Mickey decides they should get to work anyway, and the three split up to hunt the ghosts individually. The exterminators are toyed with at every turn; Mickey is driven upstairs and tries to open a door, which opens in a splash of water. Donald, meanwhile, is whacked with a wooden board and is scared away by the sounds of banging chains and dishes. Goofy, in a bedroom, becomes tangled in a dresser and stabs his own rear with a pin, mistaking his blue pants for a ghost. In the end, the three exterminators accidentally become covered in molasses and flour, making them look like ghosts and consequently scaring the actual ghosts out of the house in a panic. The ghost hunters stand victorious, having driven the spirits out of the house, although not exactly certain how. Donald smugly assumes the ghosts fled in capitulation to their superior tactics.

Goofy offers what is considered the most memorable quote while warily looking around him: "I'm brave! But I'm careful." Other quotes include Donald's observation: "So you can't take it, you big sissies!", or another Goofy quip: "I ain't scared of no ghosts!" (weakly boasted while hiding from a ghost-engineered scare).

Read more about this topic:  Lonesome Ghosts

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