Generic Property

Generic Property

In mathematics, properties that hold for "typical" examples are called generic properties. For instance, a generic property of a class of functions is one that is true of "almost all" of those functions, as in the statements, "A generic polynomial does not have a root at zero," or "A generic matrix is invertible." As another example, a generic property of a space is a property that holds at "almost all" points of the space, as in the statement, "If f : MN is a smooth function between smooth manifolds, then a generic point of N is not a critical value of f." (This is by Sard's theorem.)

There are many different notions of "generic" (what is meant by "almost all") in mathematics, with corresponding dual notions of "almost none" (negligible set); the two main classes are:

  • In measure theory, a generic property is one that holds almost everywhere, meaning "with probability 1", with the dual concept being null set, meaning "with probability 0".
  • In topology and algebraic geometry, a generic property is one that holds on a dense open set, or more generally on a residual set, with the dual concept being a nowhere dense set, or more generally a meagre set.

Read more about Generic PropertyDefinitions: Measure Theory, Definitions: Topology, Genericity Results

Other articles related to "generic property, generic":

Generic Property - Genericity Results
... Sard's theorem If is a smooth function between smooth manifolds, then a generic point of N is not a critical value of f – critical values of f are a null set in N ... Jacobian criterion / generic smoothness A generic point of a variety over a field of characteristic zero is smooth ...

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