Churaman - The Battle of Jajau and Rise of Churaman

The Battle of Jajau and Rise of Churaman

Aurangzeb died in 1707. Taking advantage of the weakness of Mughal rule Churaman planned to expand his state. His rise started from the battle of Jajau in 1707. After the war was over he looted both armies of Azam as well as Muazzam. Churaman showed wisdom and decided to be honest to the New Mughal ruler with a view to protect huge wealth of booty. He appeared before Bahadurshah on 15 September 1707 and presented gifts in his honour.

In January 1709 Churaman entered into an agreement with Jai Singh II, looking to the possibilities of victory of Rajputs in wars of Sambhar and Kaman and Bahadurshah’s intention to compromise with them. Under the garb of agreement Churaman intensified his campaign to abolish Rajput Zamindars and capturing back the Jat areas occupied by Kachwahas. He succeeded in getting back Sogar, Bhusawar, Kaman, Khohari, Kot, Khunthare, Ithera, Jadila and Chaugdara.

In 1710 Churaman Joined Bahdurshah in his Sikh campaign. He took part in Sadhaura and Lohagarh wars and went up to Lahore with Bahadurshah. Churaman was excused unconditionally and returned his old Mansab.

After the death of Bahadurshah his son Jahandarshah became the successor. In 1713 when there was a war between Jahandar and Farrukhsiyar, Churaman looted both after the war. This way he got a lot of wealth in booty. Similarly he captured elephants of the Royal army in Hasanpur war.

Read more about this topic:  Churaman

Other articles related to "the battle of jajau and rise of churaman, churaman, rise, the battle of jajau":

Maharaja Churaman - The Battle of Jajau and Rise of Churaman
... Taking advantage of the weakness of Mughal rule Churaman planned to expand his state ... His rise started from the battle of Jajau in 1707 ... Churaman showed wisdom and decided to be honest to the New Mughal ruler with a view to protect huge wealth of booty ...

Famous quotes containing the words rise and/or battle:

    Creation destroys as it goes, throws down one tree for the rise of another. But ideal mankind would abolish death, multiply itself million upon million, rear up city upon city, save every parasite alive, until the accumulation of mere existence is swollen to a horror.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    War consisteth not in battle only, or the act of fighting; but in a tract of time, wherein the will to contend by battle is sufficiently known.
    Thomas Hobbes (1588–1679)