Brugada Syndrome

The Brugada syndrome is a genetic disease that is characterised by abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG) findings and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. It is named by the Spanish/Belgian cardiologists Pedro Brugada and Josep Brugada. It is the major cause of sudden unexplained death syndrome (SUDS), and is the most common cause of sudden death in young men without known underlying cardiac disease in Thailand and Laos.

Although the ECG findings of Brugada syndrome were first reported among survivors of cardiac arrest in 1989, it was only in 1992 that the Brugada brothers recognized it as a distinct clinical entity, causing sudden death by causing ventricular fibrillation (a lethal arrhythmia) in the heart.

Read more about Brugada SyndromeGenetics and Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Treatment

Other articles related to "syndromes, brugada syndrome, syndrome":

Ventricular Fibrillation - Pathophysiology
... Recently-described syndromes such as the Brugada Syndrome may give clues to the underlying mechanism of ventricular arrhythmias ... In the Brugada syndrome, changes may be found in the resting ECG with evidence of right bundle branch block (RBBB) and ST elevation in the chest leads V1-V3, with an underlying propensity to sudden cardiac death ... For example, in Brugada Syndrome, sodium channels are affected ...
Brugada Syndrome - Treatment
... The cause of death in Brugada syndrome is ventricular fibrillation ... reliably and totally prevents ventricular fibrillation from occurring in this syndrome, treatment lies in termination of this lethal arrhythmia before it ... antiarrhythmic drug, for decreasing VF episodes occurring in this syndrome ...

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