Army Service Uniform

The U.S. Army service uniform is the military uniform worn by personnel in situations where formal dress is called for. It is worn in most workday situations in which business dress would be called for. It can be worn at most public and official functions.

The green service uniform is slowly being replaced by the blue uniform.

The blue Army Service Uniform (ASU) is the "new" service uniform, and was adopted for optional wear in 2008. It was issued to new soldiers starting in the fall of 2010, and must be worn army-wide after October 2015. The ASU is replacing two uniforms already in use – the "Army Green" service uniform and the "Army White" service uniform. It will be based on the current dress uniform known as the "dress blue" uniform. It has its roots in the "Army Blue" uniform, which dates back to the Revolutionary War, in which the Continental Army outfitted its soldiers in blue to distinguish them from the red uniform coats of the British Army. It also recalls the Civil War Union Army's blue uniforms.

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Famous quotes containing the words uniform, army and/or service:

    When a uniform exercise of kindness to prisoners on our part has been returned by as uniform severity on the part of our enemies, you must excuse me for saying it is high time, by other lessons, to teach respect to the dictates of humanity; in such a case, retaliation becomes an act of benevolence.
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    Why not draft executive and management brains to prepare and produce the equipment the $21-a-month draftee must use and forget this dollar-a-year tommyrot? Would we send an army into the field under a dollar-a-year General who had to be home Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays?
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