William Jennings Bryan

William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was a leading American politician from the 1890s until his death. He was a dominant force in the liberal wing of the Democratic Party, standing three times as its candidate for President of the United States (1896, 1900 and 1908). He served in Congress briefly as a Representative from Nebraska and was the 41st United States Secretary of State under President Woodrow Wilson (1913–1915), taking a pacifist position on the World War. Bryan was a devout Christian, a supporter of popular democracy, and an enemy of the gold standard as well as banks and railroads. He was a leader of the silverite movement in the 1890s, a peace advocate, a prohibitionist, and an opponent of Darwinism on religious and humanitarian grounds. With his deep, commanding voice and wide travels, he was one of the best known orators and lecturers of the era. Because of his faith in the wisdom of the common people, he was called "The Great Commoner."

In the intensely fought 1896 and 1900 elections, he was defeated by William McKinley but retained control of the Democratic Party. With over 500 speeches in 1896, Bryan invented the national stumping tour, in an era when other presidential candidates stayed home. In his three presidential bids, he promoted Free Silver in 1896, anti-imperialism in 1900, and trust-busting in 1908, calling on Democrats to fight the trusts (big corporations) and big banks, and embrace anti-elitist ideals of republicanism. President Wilson appointed him Secretary of State in 1913, but Wilson's strong demands on Germany after the Lusitania was torpedoed in 1915 caused Bryan to resign in protest. After 1920 he was a strong supporter of Prohibition and energetically attacked Darwinism and evolution, most famously at the Scopes Trial in 1925. Five days after the end of the case, he died in his sleep.

Read more about William Jennings BryanBackground and Early Career: 1860–1896, First Campaign For The White House: 1896, War and Peace: 1898–1900, Presidential Election of 1900, Presidential Election of 1908, Chautauqua Circuit: 1900–1912, Secretary of State: 1913–1915, Prohibition Battles: 1916–1925, Fighting The Theory of Evolution: 1918–1925, Death, Popular Image, Legacy

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William Jennings Bryan - Legacy - Honors
... This section needs additional citations for verification Bryan County, Oklahoma is named after him ... Bryan Memorial Hospital (now BryanLGH Medical Center) of Lincoln, Nebraska, and Bryan College located in Dayton, Tennessee, are also named for ... The William Jennings Bryan House in Nebraska was named a U.S ...

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    I am the first to admit that I am no great orator or no person that got where I have gotten by any William Jennings Bryan technique.
    Gerald R. Ford (b. 1913)

    I think we will live through his term, Archie, and I’ll tell you something, old man, if they don’t stop hammering me, first Bryan for not enforcing the Anti-Trust Law and Wall Street for enforcing it, they may succeed in electing me to another term whether I want it or not.
    William Howard Taft (1857–1930)

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    —Sir William Osler (1849–1919)

    I am the first to admit that I am no great orator or no person that got where I have gotten by any William Jennings Bryan technique.
    Gerald R. Ford (b. 1913)