What is first principle?

First Principle

In mathematics, first principles are referred to as axioms or postulates. Gödel's incompleteness theorems have been taken to prove, among other things, that no system of axioms that describe the set of natural numbers can prove its own validity - nor perhaps can it prove every truth about the natural numbers.

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Some articles on first principle:

Franck–Condon Principle
... The Franck–Condon principle is a rule in spectroscopy and quantum chemistry that explains the intensity of vibronic transitions ... The principle states that during an electronic transition, a change from one vibrational energy level to another will be more likely to happen if the two vibrational wave functions overlap more significantly ...
First Principle - In Physics
... In physics, a calculation is said to be from first principles, or ab initio, if it starts directly at the level of established laws of physics and does not ...
Generally Accepted Accounting Principles - US GAAP - The Basic Principles
... Principles derive from tradition, such as the concept of matching ... Principle of regularity Regularity can be defined as conformity to enforced rules and laws ... Principle of consistency This principle states that when a business has once fixed a method for the accounting treatment of an item, it will enter in ...
Freedom Of Expression - Limitations
... Limitations to freedom of speech may follow the "harm principle" or the "offense principle", for example in the case of pornography, or hate speech ... However, Mill also introduced what is known as the harm principle, in placing the following limitation on free expression "the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a ... actor, and that it is probably a necessary means to that end." Hence Feinberg argues that the harm principle sets the bar too high and that some forms of ...

Famous quotes containing the word principle:

    He was always late on principle, his principle being that punctuality is the thief of time.
    Oscar Wilde (1854–1900)

    No two men see the world exactly alike, and different temperaments will apply in different ways a principle that they both acknowledge. The same man will, indeed, often see and judge the same things differently on different occasions: early convictions must give way to more mature ones. Nevertheless, may not the opinions that a man holds and expresses withstand all trials, if he only remains true to himself and others?
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)