Tungsten Carbide

Tungsten carbide (WC) is an inorganic chemical compound (specifically, a carbide) containing equal parts of tungsten and carbon atoms. Colloquially among workers in various industries (such as machining and carpentry), tungsten carbide is often simply called carbide (without precise distinction from other carbides). Among the lay public, the growing popularity of tungsten carbide rings has led to some consumers calling the material just tungsten, despite the inaccuracy of the usage. In its most basic form, tungsten carbide is a fine gray powder, but it can be pressed and formed into shapes for use in industrial machinery, cutting tools, abrasives, other tools and instruments, and jewelry. Tungsten carbide is approximately three times stiffer than steel, with a Young's modulus of approximately 550 GPa, and is much denser than steel or titanium. It is comparable with corundum (α-Al2O3) or sapphire in hardness and can only be polished and finished with abrasives of superior hardness such as cubic boron nitride and diamond amongst others, in the form of powder, wheels, and compounds.

Read more about Tungsten CarbideSynthesis, Chemical Properties, Physical Properties, Structure, Toxicity

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Tungsten Compounds - Applications - Hard Materials
... Tungsten is mainly used in the production of hard materials based on tungsten carbide, one of the hardest carbides, with a melting point of 2770 °C ... and accounts for about 60% of current tungsten consumption ... The jewelry industry makes rings of sintered tungsten carbide, tungsten carbide/metal composites, and also metallic tungsten ...
Cemented Carbide - History
... The initial development of cemented and sintered carbides occurred in Germany in the 1920s ... ThyssenKrupp says, "Sintered tungsten carbide was developed by the "Osram study society for electrical lighting" to replace diamonds as a material for machining metal ... In 1926 Krupp brings sintered carbide onto the market under the name WIDIA (acronym for WIe DIAmant = like diamond)." /ˈvidiə/ Green et al give the date of carbide tools' commercial introduction as 1927 ...
Cold Saw - Blades - Classification
... The second type of cold saw blade, tungsten carbide-tipped (TCT), are made with an alloy steel body and tungsten carbide inserts brazed to the tips of the teeth ... The tungsten carbide tips are capable of operating at much higher temperatures than solid HSS, therefore, TCT saw blades are usually run at much higher surface speeds ... This allows carbide-tipped blades to cut at faster rates and still maintain an acceptable chip load per tooth ...
Tungsten Carbide - Toxicity
... The primary health risks associated with carbide relate to inhalation of dust, leading to fibrosis ... Cobalt–Tungsten Carbide is also reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen by the National Toxicology Program ...
Cermet
... The metal is used as a binder for an oxide, boride, or carbide ... Cermets are being used instead of tungsten carbide in saws and other brazed tools due to their superior wear and corrosion properties ... Titanium nitride (TiN), Titanium carbonitride (TiCN), titanium carbide (TiC) and similar can be brazed like tungsten carbide if properly prepared however they require special handling during ...