Stop Consonant

Stop Consonant

In phonetics, a stop, also known as a plosive, is an oral occlusive, a consonant in which the vocal tract is blocked so that all airflow ceases. The occlusion may be done with the tongue (blade, or body, ), lips (, ), or glottis . Stops contrast with nasals, where the vocal tract is blocked but airflow continues through the nose, as in /m/ and /n/, and with fricatives, where partial occlusion impedes but does not block airflow in the vocal tract.

Read more about Stop Consonant:  Terminology, Common Stops, Articulation, Examples

Other articles related to "stop consonant":

Stop Consonant - Examples - English
... (glottal stop, not as a phoneme in most dialects). ...

Famous quotes containing the word stop:

    The mastery of one’s phonemes may be compared to the violinist’s mastery of fingering. The violin string lends itself to a continuous gradation of tones, but the musician learns the discrete intervals at which to stop the string in order to play the conventional notes. We sound our phonemes like poor violinists, approximating each time to a fancied norm, and we receive our neighbor’s renderings indulgently, mentally rectifying the more glaring inaccuracies.
    W.V. Quine (b. 1908)