Respiratory Systems

Some articles on respiratory systems, respiratory system, respiratory:

Physiology Of Dinosaurs - Respiratory System - Air Sacs
... they contained air sacs like those that make birds' respiratory systems the most efficient of all animals'. 2003, 2004) disputed this and suggested that dinosaurs had a "tidal" respiratory system (in and out) powered by a crocodile-like hepatic piston mechanism - muscles attached mainly to the pubis pull the liver ... improvements in a few aspects of a modern reptile's circulatory and respiratory systems would enable the reptile to achieve 50% to 70% of the oxygen flow of a mammal of similar size ...
Permian–Triassic Extinction Event - Extinction Patterns - Possible Explanations of These Patterns
... from calcium carbonate) and had low metabolic rates and weak respiratory systems—notably calcareous sponges, rugose and tabulate corals, calciate brachiopods, bryozoans, and echinoderms about 81% of ... with high metabolic rates, well-developed respiratory systems, and non-calcareous hard parts had negligible losses—except for conodonts, in which 33% of genera died out ... concentrations, as it reduces the ability of respiratory pigments to oxygenate tissues, and makes body fluids more acidic, thereby hampering the production of carbonate hard parts like shells ...
Aquatic Respiration - Respiratory Systems - Aquatic Birds
... The respiratory system of birds differs significantly from that found in mammals, containing unique anatomical features such as air sacs ... See Avian respiratory system for a detailed description of these and other features ...
Chelicerata - Description - Respiratory Systems
... These depend on individual sub-groups' environments ... Modern terrestrial chelicerates generally have both book lungs, which deliver oxygen and remove waste gases via the blood, and tracheae, which do the same without using the blood as a transport system ...

Famous quotes containing the word systems:

    The skylines lit up at dead of night, the air- conditioning systems cooling empty hotels in the desert and artificial light in the middle of the day all have something both demented and admirable about them. The mindless luxury of a rich civilization, and yet of a civilization perhaps as scared to see the lights go out as was the hunter in his primitive night.
    Jean Baudrillard (b. 1929)