Renaissance Architecture

Renaissance architecture is the architecture of the period between the early 15th and early 17th centuries in different regions of Europe, demonstrating a conscious revival and development of certain elements of ancient Greek and Roman thought and material culture. Stylistically, Renaissance architecture followed Gothic architecture and was succeeded by Baroque architecture. Developed first in Florence, with Filippo Brunelleschi as one of its innovators, the Renaissance style quickly spread to other Italian cities. The style was carried to France, Germany, England, Russia and other parts of Europe at different dates and with varying degrees of impact.

Renaissance style places emphasis on symmetry, proportion, geometry and the regularity of parts as they are demonstrated in the architecture of classical antiquity and in particular ancient Roman architecture, of which many examples remained. Orderly arrangements of columns, pilasters and lintels, as well as the use of semicircular arches, hemispherical domes, niches and aedicules replaced the more complex proportional systems and irregular profiles of medieval buildings.

Read more about Renaissance ArchitectureHistoriography, Principal Phases, Characteristics of Renaissance Architecture, Influences On The Development of Renaissance Architecture in Italy, Development of Renaissance Architecture in Italy - Early Renaissance, The Spread of The Renaissance in Italy, High Renaissance, Mannerism, Progression From Early Renaissance Through To Baroque, Spread of Renaissance Architecture Beyond Italy, Legacy of Renaissance Architecture

Other articles related to "renaissance architecture, renaissance, architecture":

Legacy of Renaissance Architecture
... During the 19th century there was a conscious revival of the style in Renaissance Revival architecture, that paralleled the Gothic Revival ... theorists as being the most appropriate style for Church building, the Renaissance palazzo was a good model for urban secular buildings requiring an ... office blocks and department stores continued to use the Renaissance palazzo form into the 20th century, in Mediterranean Revival Style architecture with an Italian Renaissance emphasis ...
Outline Of The Renaissance - History of The Renaissance Period - Renaissance Developments By Field
... Gunpowder warfare Renaissance architecture Renaissance architecture in Eastern Europe Elizabethan architecture (Early English Renaissance architecture) French ...
Revivalism (architecture) - List of Architectural Revivals
... Mixed styles Gründerzeit (German historicist architecture, distinctive style mélange - later variations included e.g ... with new elements) Neo-Historism (revival of historicist architecture including several revival styles - emerged from Postmodern architecture in the late 1990s) Traditionalist School (revival ...
Mannerist Architecture - Legacy of Renaissance Architecture
... was a conscious revival of the style in Renaissance Revival architecture, that paralleled the Gothic Revival ... as being the most appropriate style for Church building, the Renaissance palazzo was a good model for urban secular buildings requiring an appearance of dignity and reliability such as banks, gentlemen's ... office blocks and department stores continued to use the Renaissance palazzo form into the 20th century, in Mediterranean Revival Style architecture with an Italian ...
Sacred Architecture - Renaissance Architecture
... See also Renaissance architecture The Renaissance brought a return of classical influence and a new emphasis on rational clarity ... Renaissance architecture represents a conscious revival of Roman Architecture with its symmetry, mathematical proportions, and geometric order ... in 1418 was one of the first important religious architectural designs of the Italian renaissance ...

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