Method (computer Programming) - Static Methods

Static Methods

Static methods neither require an instance of the class nor can they implicitly access the data (or this, self, Me, etc.) of such an instance. A static method is distinguished in some programming languages with the static keyword placed somewhere in the method's signature. Static methods are called "static" because they are resolved statically (i.e. at compile time), in statically typed languages, based on the class they are called on; and not dynamically, as in the case with instance methods which are resolved polymorphically based on the runtime type of the object. Therefore, static methods cannot be overridden.

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Other articles related to "static methods, static method, static, method, methods":

Method (computer Science) - Static Methods
... Static methods neither require an instance of the class nor can they implicitly access the data (or this, self, Me, etc.) of such an instance ... A static method is distinguished in some programming languages with the static keyword placed somewhere in the method's signature ... In statically typed languages such as Java, static methods are called "static" because they are resolved statically (i.e ...
Method (computer Science) - Class Methods
... Class methods are methods that are called on a class (compare this to class instance methods, or object methods) ... C++, Java), class methods are synonymous with static methods (see section below), which are called with a known class name at compile-time ... this cannot be used in static methods ...

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