List of Traditional Gentlemen's Clubs in The United States

The following is a list of notable gentlemen's clubs in the United States, including those that now are defunct. Traditionally, these clubs were exclusively for men, but most in the United States now admit women.

The traditional gentlemen's club originated in London (in particular the St. James's area) in the 18th century as a successor to coffeehouses. Today, these clubs also continue to operate in the United States, where most major cities have at least one such club. Gentlemen's clubs are most prevalent, however, in older cities on the East Coast. More of them are located in New York City than in any other American city. Many American clubs have reciprocal relationships with the older clubs in London, with each other, and with other gentlemen's clubs around the world.

Because the term "gentlemen's club" often is used to refer euphemistically to strip clubs, in the United States gentlemen's clubs often are referred to as "men's clubs" or "city clubs" (as opposed to country club) or simply as "private clubs". For other meanings and nuances of the word "club", see club.

Contents
  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • District of Columbia
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Illinois
  • Indiana
  • Iowa
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Carolina
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
  • Wisconsin
  • Wyoming

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    F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896–1940)

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    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

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