Jewelry - Form and Function

Form and Function

Jewellery has been used for a number of reasons:

  • Currency, wealth display and storage,
  • Functional use (such as clasps, pins and buckles)
  • Symbolism (to show membership or status or religious affiliation)
  • Protection (in the form of amulets and magical wards),
  • Artistic display

Most cultures have at some point had a practice of keeping large amounts of wealth stored in the form of jewellery. Numerous cultures move wedding dowries in the form of jewellery or create jewellery as a means to store or display coins. Alternatively, jewellery has been used as a currency or trade good; an example being the use of slave beads.

Many items of jewellery, such as brooches and buckles, originated as purely functional items, but evolved into decorative items as their functional requirement diminished.

Jewellery can also be symbolic of group membership, as in the case of the Christian crucifix or Jewish Star of David, or of status, as in the case of chains of office, or the Western practice of married people wearing a wedding ring.

Wearing of amulets and devotional medals to provide protection or ward off evil is common in some cultures; these may take the form of symbols (such as the ankh), stones, plants, animals, body parts (such as the Khamsa), or glyphs (such as stylised versions of the Throne Verse in Islamic art).

Although artistic display has clearly been a function of jewellery from the very beginning, the other roles described above tended to take primacy. It was only in the late 19th century, with the work of such masters as Peter Carl Fabergé and René Lalique, that art began to take primacy over function and wealth. This trend has continued into modern times, expanded upon by artists such as Robert Lee Morris, Ed Levin, and Alberto Repossi.

Read more about this topic:  Jewelry

Other articles related to "form and function, form, forms":

Luopan - Form and Function
... A red wire or thread that crosses the earth plate and heaven dial at 90-degree angles is the Heaven Center Cross Line, or Red Cross Grid Line ... This line is used to find the direction and note position on the rings ...
Polyandry
... Polyandry (Greek poly—many, andras—man) is a form of polygamy whereby a woman takes two or more husbands at the same time ... For example, the form of polyandry in which a woman is married to two or more brothers is known as fraternal polyandry, and it is believed by many anthropologists to be the ...
Simurgh - Mythology - Form and Function
... "Si-", the first element in the name, has been connected in folk etymology to Modern Persian si "thirty" ... Although this prefix is not historically related to the origin of the name simurgh, "thirty" has nonetheless been the basis for legends incorporating that number, for instance, that the simurgh was as large as thirty birds or had thirty colours (siræng) ...
Angles - Name
... Angeln#Name The name of the Angles is first recorded in Latinized form, as Anglii, in the Germania of Tacitus ... the Great in an epistle simplified the Latinized name Anglii to Angli, the latter form developing into the preferred form of the word ... describe England and the English people Bede used Angelfolc (-folk) there are also such forms as Engel, Englan (the people), Englaland, and Englisc, all showing i-mu ...
Emulsion - Appearance and Properties - Instability
... Coalescence is another form of instability - small droplets bump into each other within the media volume and continuously combine to form progressively ...

Famous quotes containing the words function and/or form:

    The fact remains that the human being in early childhood learns to consider one or the other aspect of bodily function as evil, shameful, or unsafe. There is not a culture which does not use a combination of these devils to develop, by way of counterpoint, its own style of faith, pride, certainty, and initiative.
    Erik H. Erikson (1904–1994)

    Patience. A minor form of despair disguised as a virtue.
    Ambrose Bierce (1842–1914)