Innovation - Measurement Indices

Measurement Indices

Several indexes exist that attempt to measure innovation include:

  • The Innovation Index, developed by the Indiana Business Research Center, to measure innovation capacity at the county or regional level in the U.S.
  • The State Technology and Science Index, developed by the Milken Institute is a U.S. wide benchmark to measure the science and technology capabilities that furnish high paying jobs based around key components.
  • The Oslo Manual is focused on North America, Europe, and other rich economies.
  • The Bogota Manual, similar to the above, focuses on Latin America and the Caribbean countries.
  • The Creative Class developed by Richard Florida
  • The Innovation Capacity Index (ICI) published by a large number of international professors working in a collaborative fashion. The top scorers of ICI 2009–2010 being: 1. Sweden 82.2; 2. Finland 77.8; and 3. United States 77.5.
  • The Global Innovation Index is a global index measuring the level of innovation of a country, produced jointly by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG), the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), and The Manufacturing Institute (MI), the NAM's nonpartisan research affiliate. NAM describes it as the "largest and most comprehensive global index of its kind".
  • The INSEAD Global Innovation Index
  • The INSEAD Innovation Efficacy Index

Read more about this topic:  Innovation

Other articles related to "measurement indices":

Measurement Indices - Global Innovation Index
... The global innovation index looks at both the business outcomes of innovation and government's ability to encourage and support innovation through public policy ... The study comprised a survey of more than 1,000 senior executives from NAM member companies across all industries in-depth interviews with 30 of the executives and a comparison of the "innovation friendliness" of 110 countries and all 50 U.S ...

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