History of Australian Rules Football in Victoria (1859–1900) - Home Grounds of Senior Clubs

Home Grounds of Senior Clubs

In general, this list covers 19th century football grounds only but the final year of use is usually included, even if this was in the 20th or 21st century:

Albert Park
early 1870s-1976 Albert Park played its last season as "Albert Park cum North Melbourne"
Brunswick
1865–1896 near the corner of Sydney & Glenlyon Rds
1897–1907 Parkville land now occupied by the Ransford & McAlister ovals
Carlton
1864- Madeleine Street oval where Newman College now stands in Swanston Street North
? southern end of Princes Park
? The Triangle now the site of University Women's College
1897–2003 Princes Park (northern end) first games not played until Round 6 of the 1897 season
now known as Visy Park
Carlton Imperials
late 1860s-1876 Royal Park
Collingwood
1892–1999 Victoria Park Britannia had used the ground prior to Collingwood
2000-2003: known as Jock McHale Stadium
East Melbourne
early-1870s-1881 East Melbourne Cricket Ground (see above)
Essendon
1873-1874? McCracken's Paddock at the McCracken's family home
1875?-1881 near Newmarket railway station
1882–1921 East Melbourne Cricket Ground (see above)
Fitzroy
1883–1966 Brunswick Street oval formerly the home of the Normanby Football club
Footscray
1875-early 1880s Cowper Street paddock
early 1880s-1885 Market Reserve Barkly Street
1885–1997 Western Oval 1885 was also Footscray's first VFA season
now known as Whitten Oval
Geelong
1859
1878-1940
Corio Oval at least one game is recorded as being played at Corio Cricket Ground in 1859
became Geelong's home ground in 1878
1860–1877 Argyle Square 1860 was the first year in which Geelong is recorded as playing inter-club games
Melbourne
1859–1884 Jolimont
outside the MCG
football was not permitted on the MCG in the early days because it was felt that it would damage the Cricket Club's turf wickets
1876-1941 &
1945–2011
& continuing
Melbourne Cricket Ground the first football match permitted at the MGC was in 1876 but most games were still played outside the MGC itself
1884 Friendly Societies Ground later known as the Motordrome, now Olympic Park
North Melbourne/
Hotham
1869-1875 & 1877-1884 Royal Park
1884-1964 & 1966-1985 Arden Street Oval
Port Melbourne
1880-1941 &
1945-2011
& continuing
North Port oval
1945 Amateur Sports Ground now Olympic Park
most games played there but, later in the season, a few were played at North Port oval
Prahran
1886–1887 Warehousemen's Ground
St Kilda Road
now known as the Albert Ground
in 1887, the VFA forced Prahran to amalgamate with St Kilda
1893-1958
1960-1994
Toorak Park Hawksburn changed its name to Prahran immediately prior to moving to this ground
Richmond
1885–1964 Punt Road Oval
St Kilda
1873–1885 Alpaca Paddock
1886–1965 Junction Oval
South Melbourne
1864-? St Vincent Gardens near the former Three Chain Road between Albert Park and Middle Park railway stations
1874-1943 & 1946-1981 Lakeside Oval Now known as Bob Jane Stadium and configured for soccer
South Williamstown
1886–1887 Port Gellibrand Oval/
Williamstown Cricket Ground
South Williamstown played two seasons in the VFA before merging with Williamstown
Warehousemen's
1870s Warehousemen's Cricket Ground Warehousemen's Cricket Club used this ground but its use by the Warehousemen's Football Club needs confirmation
Ground still exists as the Albert Ground (St Kilda Road)
West Melbourne
1900–1907 Arden Street Oval ground shared with North Melbourne, with whom West Melbourne amalgamated in 1907 in an unsuccessful attempt to join the VFL
Williamstown
1864?-1872 Market Place Reserve on the site of the present Robertson Reserve
1872–1887 Gardens Reserve now known as Fearon Reserve
1888-2011
& continuing
Port Gellibrand Oval/
Williamstown Cricket Ground
began using the ground when the club amalgamated with South Williamstown

Read more about this topic:  History Of Australian Rules Football In Victoria (1859–1900)

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