Feminism - Relationship To Political Movements

Relationship To Political Movements

Feminism had complex interactions with the major political movements of the twentieth century.

Read more about this topic:  Feminism

Other articles related to "relationship to political movements, movement, movements":

Feminism - Relationship To Political Movements - Civil Rights Movement and Anti-racism
... The civil rights movement has influenced and informed the feminist movement and vice versa ... between the women's and civil rights movements, some tension arose during the late 1960s and early 1970s as non-white women argued that feminism was ... Similarly, some women argued that the civil rights movement had sexist elements and did not adequately address minority women's concerns ...

Famous quotes containing the words relationship to, movements, relationship and/or political:

    Artists have a double relationship towards nature: they are her master and her slave at the same time. They are her slave in so far as they must work with means of this world so as to be understood; her master in so far as they subject these means to their higher goals and make them subservient to them.
    Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    Justice begins with the recognition of the necessity of sharing. The oldest law is that which regulates it, and this is still the most important law today and, as such, has remained the basic concern of all movements which have at heart the community of human activities and of human existence in general.
    Elias Canetti (b. 1905)

    I began to expand my personal service in the church, and to search more diligently for a closer relationship with God among my different business, professional and political interests.
    Jimmy Carter (James Earl Carter, Jr.)

    It is time that we start thinking about foundational issues: about our attitudes toward fair trials... Who are the People in a multicultural society?... The victims of discrimination are now organized. Blacks, Jews, gays, women—they will no longer tolerate second-class status. They seek vindication for past grievances in the trials that take place today, the new political trial.
    George P. Fletcher, U.S. law educator. With Justice for Some, p. 6, Addison-Wesley (1995)