Cultural Feminism

Cultural feminism developed from radical feminism. It is an ideology of a "female nature" or "female essence" that attempts to revalidate what cultural feminists consider undervalued female attributes. It is also a theory that commends the difference of women from men.

Its critics assert that because it is based on an essentialist view of the differences between women and men and advocates independence and institution building, it has led feminists to retreat from practicing public politics to a focus upon individual "life-style". Alice Echols (a feminist historian and cultural theorist), credits Redstockings member Brooke Williams with introducing the term cultural feminism in 1975 to describe the depoliticisation of radical feminism.

Read more about Cultural FeminismCultural Feminist Ideas, Critics

Other articles related to "feminism, cultural feminism":

Radical Feminism - Criticisms
... Betty Friedan and other liberal feminists often see precisely the radicalism of radical feminism as potentially undermining the gains of the women's movement with polarizing rhetoric that ... Other critics of radical feminism from the political left, including socialist feminists, strongly disagree with the radical feminist position that the oppression of women is fundamental to all other ... Radical feminism has been accused of being transphobic, for example in 1979 Janice Raymond's book The Transsexual Empire described transsexuality as a "patriarchal myth" ...
Cultural Feminism - Critics
... Because cultural feminism is based on an essentialist view of the differences between women and men and advocates independence and institution building, it ...

Famous quotes containing the words feminism and/or cultural:

    It’s important to remember that feminism is no longer a group of organizations or leaders. It’s the expectations that parents have for their daughters, and their sons, too. It’s the way we talk about and treat one another. It’s who makes the money and who makes the compromises and who makes the dinner. It’s a state of mind. It’s the way we live now.
    Anna Quindlen (20th century)

    The sickly cultural pathos which the whole of France indulges in, that fetishism of the cultural heritage.
    Jean Baudrillard (b. 1929)