Female - Etymology and Usage

Etymology and Usage

The word female comes from the Latin femella, the diminutive form of femina, meaning "woman," which is not etymologically related to the word male. In the late 14th century, the spelling was altered in English to parallel the spelling of male.

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Famous quotes containing the words usage and/or etymology:

    I am using it [the word ‘perceive’] here in such a way that to say of an object that it is perceived does not entail saying that it exists in any sense at all. And this is a perfectly correct and familiar usage of the word.
    —A.J. (Alfred Jules)

    The universal principle of etymology in all languages: words are carried over from bodies and from the properties of bodies to express the things of the mind and spirit. The order of ideas must follow the order of things.
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