Ecosystem Ecology

Ecosystem ecology is the integrated study of biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems and their interactions within an ecosystem framework. This science examines how ecosystems work and relates this to their components such as chemicals, bedrock, soil, plants, and animals.

Ecosystem ecology examines physical and biological structures and examines how these ecosystem characteristics interact with each other. Ultimately, this helps us understand how to maintain high quality water and economically viable commodity production. A major focus of ecosystem ecology is on functional processes, ecological mechanisms that maintain the structure and services produced by ecosystems. These include primary productivity (production of biomass), decomposition, and trophic interactions.

Studies of ecosystem function have greatly improved human understanding of sustainable production of forage, fiber, fuel, and provision of water. Functional processes are mediated by regional-to-local level climate, disturbance, and management. Thus ecosystem ecology provides a powerful framework for identifying ecological mechanisms that interact with global environmental problems, especially global warming and degradation of surface water.

This example demonstrates several important aspects of ecosystems:

  1. Ecosystem boundaries are often nebulous and may fluctuate in time
  2. Organisms within ecosystems are dependent on ecosystem level biological and physical processes
  3. Adjacent ecosystems closely interact and often are interdependent for maintenance of community structure and functional processes that maintain productivity and biodiversity

These characteristics also introduce practical problems into natural resource management. Who will manage which ecosystem? Will timber cutting in the forest degrade recreational fishing in the stream? These questions are difficult for land managers to address while the boundary between ecosystems remains unclear; even though decisions in one ecosystem will affect the other. We need better understanding of the interactions and interdependencies of these ecosystems and the processes that maintain them before we can begin to address these questions.

Ecosystem ecology is an inherently interdisciplinary field of study. An individual ecosystem is composed of populations of organisms, interacting within communities, and contributing to the cycling of nutrients and the flow of energy. The ecosystem is the principal unit of study in ecosystem ecology.

Population, community, and physiological ecology provide many of the underlying biological mechanisms influencing ecosystems and the processes they maintain. Cycling of energy and matter at the ecosystem level are often examined in ecosystem ecology, but, as a whole, this science is defined more by subject matter than by scale. Ecosystem ecology approaches organisms and abiotic pools of energy and nutrients as an integrated system which distinguishes it from associated sciences such as biogeochemistry.

Biogeochemistry and hydrology focus on several fundamental ecosystem processes such as biologically mediated chemical cycling of nutrients and physical-biological cycling of water. Ecosystem ecology forms the mechanistic basis for regional or global processes encompassed by landscape-to-regional hydrology, global biogeochemistry, and earth system science.

Read more about Ecosystem Ecology:  History, Ecosystem Services, Operation

Other articles related to "ecosystem ecology, ecosystems, ecosystem, ecology":

Systems Ecology - Closely Related Fields - Ecosystem Ecology
... Ecosystem ecology is the integrated study of biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems and their interactions within an ecosystem framework ... This science examines how ecosystems work and relates this to their components such as chemicals, bedrock, soil, plants, and animals ... Ecosystem ecology examines physical and biological structure and examines how these ecosystem characteristics interact ...
Integrative Levels, Scope, and Scale of Organization - Ecosystem Ecology - Keystone Species
... Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) are commonly cited as an example of a keystone species because they limit the density of sea urchins that feed on kelp ... If sea otters are removed from the system, the urchins graze until the kelp beds disappear and this has a dramatic effect on community structure ...
Ecological Theories - Ecosystem Ecology - Systems Ecology
... Systems ecology can be seen as an application of general systems theory to ecology ... of ecological systems, and particularly ecosystems ... Systems ecology is especially concerned with the way the functioning of ecosystems can be influenced by human interventions ...
Ecosystem Ecology - Applications and Importance - Lessons From Two Central American Cities
... Ecosystem ecology plays an important role in understanding and adapting to the most pressing current environmental problems ... Restoration ecology and ecosystem management are closely associated with ecosystem ecology ... depends on integration of functional mechanisms of ecosystems ...

Famous quotes containing the word ecology:

    ... the fundamental principles of ecology govern our lives wherever we live, and ... we must wake up to this fact or be lost.
    Karin Sheldon (b. c. 1945)