Deism

Deism is the belief that reason and observation of the natural world are sufficient to determine the existence of a creator, accompanied with the rejection of revelation and authority as a source of religious knowledge. Deism became more prominent in the 17th and 18th centuries during the Age of Enlightenment—especially in Britain, France, Germany and America—among intellectuals raised as Christians who believed in one god, but found fault with organized religion and could not believe in supernatural events such as miracles, the inerrancy of scriptures, or the Trinity.

Deism is derived from deus, the Latin word for god. The earliest known usage in print of the English term deist is 1621, and deism is first found in a 1675 dictionary. Deistic ideas influenced several leaders of the American and French Revolutions. Two main forms of deism currently exist: classical deism and modern deism.

Read more about Deism:  Overview, Features of Deism, Deism Today

Other articles related to "deism":

Deism Today - Recent Discussion of The Role of Deism
... Charles Taylor, in his 2007 book A Secular Age, showed the historical role of deism, leading to what he calls an exclusive humanism ... One of the special achievements of such deism-based humanism is that it discloses new, anthropocentric moral sources by which human beings are motivated and empowered to accomplish acts of mutual benefit ... According to Taylor, by the early 19th century this deism-mediated exclusive humanism developed as an alternative to Christian faith in a personal God and an order ...
Religion In Europe - Deism
... During the Enlightenment, Deism became influential especially in England and France ... Biblical concepts were challenged by concepts such as a heleocentric universe and other scientific challenges to the Bible ...
Thomas Jefferson And Religion - Jefferson and Deism
... Jefferson used in the Declaration of Independence, are typical of Deism, although they were also used at the time by non-Deist thinkers, such as Francis Hutcheson ... Jefferson was directly linked to deism in the writings of some of his contemporaries ... In an 1803 letter to Priestley, Jefferson praises Jesus for a form of deism ...
Cayetano Ripoll
... While being held by the French he was taken to France and there he became aware of deism ... as a school master to teach others about deism ... Inquisition of being a deist and of teaching his students about deism ...