Daimyo

Daimyo (大名, daimyō?, Pronunciation) (dah-ee-myoh) is a generic term referring to the powerful territorial lords in pre-modern Japan who ruled most of the country from their vast, hereditary land holdings. In the term, "dai" (大?) literally means "large", and "myō" stands for myōden (名田?), meaning private land.

Subordinate only to the shogun, daimyo were the most powerful feudal rulers from the 10th century to the middle 19th century in Japan. From the shugo of the Muromachi period through the Sengoku to the daimyo of the Edo period, the rank had a long and varied history.

The term "daimyo" is also sometimes used to refer to the leading figures of such clans, also called "lord". It was usually, though not exclusively, from these warlords that a shogun arose or a regent was chosen. Daimyo often hired samurai to guard their land and they paid the samurai in land or food. Relatively few daimyo could afford to pay samurai in money. The daimyo era came to an end soon after the Meiji restoration when Japan adopted the prefecture system in 1871.

Read more about Daimyo:  Shugo-daimyō, Sengoku-daimyō, Daimyo in The Edo Period, After The Meiji Restoration

Other articles related to "daimyo":

Sagara Yoshiharu
... (1544–1581) was a Japanese daimyo of the Sengoku period, who ruled a region in southern Higo Province ... His descendants were eventually confirmed in their landholdings, and remained daimyo until the Meiji Restoration ... Sagara, Yoshiharu Alternative names Short description Daimyo who ruled a region in southern Higo Province Date of birth 1544 Place of birth Date of death 1581 Place of death ...
Makino Tadakatsu
... April 12, 1859 – February 3, 1918) was a Japanese daimyo of the late Edo period ... He was the last daimyo of the Nagaoka Domain ... abolished) Persondata Name Makino Tadakatsu Alternative names Short description Daimyo Date of birth April 12, 1859 Place of birth Edo, Japan Date of death February 3, 1918 Place of death ...
Daimyo - After The Meiji Restoration
... In 1869, the year after the Meiji Restoration, the daimyo, together with the kuge, formed a new aristocracy, the kazoku ... thus effectively ending the daimyo era in Japan ... In the wake of this change, many daimyo remained in control of their lands, being appointed as prefectural governors however, they were soon relieved of this duty and called en masse to Tokyo, thereby cutting off ...
Mizuno Katsutomo
... Mizuno Katsutomo (水野 勝知?) (March 21, 1838 – April 22, 1919)- Japanese daimyo of the late Edo period ... Born the 8th son of Niwa Nagatomi, daimyo of Nihonmatsu (Mutsu Province 100,000 koku), he was adopted by Mizuno Katsutō, the 14th generation daimyo of Yūk ...
Aoki Kazuoki
... (青木 一興?, 1822 – 26 September 1849) was the 12th daimyo of Asada Domain in Settsu Province, Japan ... Kazuoki was the sixth son of Aoki Kazusada, the 10th daimyo ... died on 26 September 1849 at age 28, having been daimyo for only two years ...