Cubic Foot

The cubic foot is an Imperial and US customary (non-metric) unit of volume, used in the United States and the United Kingdom. It is defined as the volume of a cube with sides of one foot (0.3048 m) in length. To calculate cubic feet multiply length X width X height.

Read more about Cubic Foot:  Conversions, Symbols, Cubic Foot Per Second, Cubic Foot Per Minute, Standard Cubic Foot

Other articles related to "cubic foot, cubic":

Glossary Of Fuel Cell Terms - S - Standard Cubic Foot
... A standard cubic foot (SFC) is a measure of quantity of gas, equal to a cubic foot of volume at 60 degrees Fahrenheit and either 14.696 pounds-force per square inch (1 atm or 101.325 kPa) or 14.73 psi (30 inHg or 101 ...
Conversion Of Units - Tables of Conversion Factors - Energy
... International Table) CHUIT ≡ 1 BTUIT × 1 K/°R = 1.899 534. 716×103 J cubic centimetre of atmosphere standard cubic centimetre cc atm scc ≡ 1 atm × 1 cm3 = 0.101 325 J cubic foot of ...
Standard Cubic Foot
... A standard cubic foot (abbreviated scf) is a measure of quantity of gas, sometimes but not always defined as a cubic foot of volume at 60 degrees Fahrenheit ...
Standard Cubic Feet Per Minute - Actual Cubic Feet Per Minute
... Actual cubic foot per minute (ACFM) is the volume of gas flowing anywhere in a system, independent of its temperature and pressure ... When positive pressure is applied to a standard cubic foot of gas, it is compressed ... When a vacuum is applied to a standard cubic foot of gas, it expands ...
Customary Units In The United States - Units of Capacity and Volume
... Volume in general Unit Divisions SI Equivalent 1 cubic inch (cu in) or (in3) 16.387064 mL 1 cubic foot (cu ft) or (ft3) 1728 cu in 28.31685 L 1 cubic yard (cu yd) or (yd3) 27 ... Other than the cubic inch, cubic foot and cubic yard, these units are differently sized from the units in the imperial system, although the names of the units are similar ...

Famous quotes containing the words foot and/or cubic:

    The world is all the richer for having a devil in it, so long as we keep our foot upon his neck.
    William James (1842–1910)

    One of the great natural phenomena is the way in which a tube of toothpaste suddenly empties itself when it hears that you are planning a trip, so that when you come to pack it is just a twisted shell of its former self, with not even a cubic millimeter left to be squeezed out.
    Robert Benchley (1889–1945)