Cryptography - History of Cryptography and Cryptanalysis

History of Cryptography and Cryptanalysis

Before the modern era, cryptography was concerned solely with message confidentiality (i.e., encryption)—conversion of messages from a comprehensible form into an incomprehensible one and back again at the other end, rendering it unreadable by interceptors or eavesdroppers without secret knowledge (namely the key needed for decryption of that message). Encryption was used to (attempt to) ensure secrecy in communications, such as those of spies, military leaders, and diplomats. In recent decades, the field has expanded beyond confidentiality concerns to include techniques for message integrity checking, sender/receiver identity authentication, digital signatures, interactive proofs and secure computation, among others.

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Other articles related to "history of cryptography and cryptanalysis, cryptanalysis, cryptography, and cryptanalysis":

History of Cryptography and Cryptanalysis - Computer Era
... Cryptanalysis of the new mechanical devices proved to be both difficult and laborious ... digital computers and electronics helped in cryptanalysis, it made possible much more complex ciphers ... Computer use has thus supplanted linguistic cryptography, both for cipher design and cryptanalysis ...

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