Chlorine

Chlorine is a chemical element with symbol Cl and atomic number 17. Chlorine is in the halogen group (17) and is the second lightest halogen after fluorine. The element is a yellow-green gas under standard conditions, where it forms diatomic molecules. It has the highest electron affinity and the third highest electronegativity of all the elements; for this reason, chlorine is a strong oxidizing agent. Free chlorine is rare on Earth, and is usually a result of direct or indirect oxidation by oxygen.

The most common compound of chlorine, sodium chloride, has been known since ancient times. Around 1630 chlorine gas was first sythesized in a chemical reaction, but not recognized as a fundamentally important substance. Characterization of chlorine gas was made in 1774 by Carl Wilhelm Scheele, who supposed it an oxide of a new element. In 1809 chemists suggested that the gas might be a pure element, and this was confirmed by Sir Humphry Davy in 1810, who named it from Ancient Greek: χλωρóς khlôros "pale green".

Nearly all chlorine in the Earth's crust occurs as chloride in various ionic compounds, including table salt. It is the second most abundant halogen and 21st most abundant chemical element in Earth's crust. Elemental chlorine is commercially produced from brine by electrolysis. The high oxidizing potential of elemental chlorine led commercially to free chlorine's bleaching and disinfectant uses, as well as its many uses of an essential reagent in the chemical industry. Chlorine is used in the manufacture of a wide range of consumer products, about two-thirds of them organic chemicals such as polyvinyl chloride, as well as many intermediates for production of plastics and other end products which do not contain the element. As a common disinfectant, elemental chlorine and chlorine-generating compounds are used more directly in swimming pools to keep them clean and sanitary.

In the form of chloride ions, chlorine is necessary to all known species of life. Other types of chlorine compounds are rare in living organisms, and artificially produced chlorinated organics range from inert to toxic. In the upper atmosphere, chlorine-containing organic molecules such as chlorofluorocarbons have been implicated in ozone depletion. Small quantities of elemental chlorine are generated by oxidation of chloride to hypochlorite in neutrophils, as part of the immune response against bacteria. Elemental chlorine at high concentrations is extremely dangerous and poisonous for all living organisms, and was historically used in World War I as the first gaseous chemical warfare agent.

Read more about Chlorine:  History, Production, Health Effects of The Free Element and Hazards, Organochlorine Compounds As Polutants

Other articles related to "chlorine":

Chlorine-37 - Occurrence
... The representative terrestrial abundance of chlorine-37 is 24.22(4)% of chlorine atoms, with a normal range of 24.14–24.36% of chlorine atoms ... SMOC is known to be around 24.219% chlorine-37 and to have an atomic weight of around 35.4525 There is a known variation in the isotopic abundance of chlorine-37 ...
Mercury In Fish - Sources
... into fish originates with coal-burning power plants and chlorine production plants ... Chlorine chemical plants use mercury to extract chlorine from salt, which in many parts of the world is discharged as mercury compounds in waste water, though this process has been ...
Chlorine - Organochlorine Compounds As Polutants
... Chlorine is added both to pesticides and pharmaceuticals to make the molecules more resistant to enzymatic degradation by bacteria, insects, and mammals, but this property also ...
Chlorine-37
... Chlorine-37, or 37Cl, is one of the stable isotopes of chlorine, the other being chlorine-35 (35Cl) ... Chlorine-37 accounts for 24.23% of natural chlorine, chlorine-35 accounting for 75.77%, giving chlorine atoms in bulk an apparent atomic weight of 35.453(2) g·mol−1 ... discovered by an experiment using a radiochemical method based on Chlorine-37 transmutation ...
Chlorinated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon
... hydrocarbons with two or more aromatic rings and one or more chlorine atoms attached to the ring system ... into two groups chloro-substituted PAHs, which have one or more hydrogen atoms substituted by a chlorine atom, and chloro-added ClPAHs, which have two or more ...