Charles Wolfe - Death

Death

Wolfe remained at Donoughmore until 1820, but, rejected by the woman for whom he gave up his academic career, and with his only real friend in County Tyrone now dead (Meredith), he moved to Cobh, where he remained until his death three years later from consumption (tuberculosis), caught from a cow at the age of 31. He is buried in Cobh at the cemetery known locally as Old Church Cemetery, but properly Clonmel Cemetery. There is also a plaque to his memory in the church at Castlecaulfield, the village where he lived whilst Curate at Donaghmore, as well as a marble monument to him at St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin.

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