Bear Island (Norway)

Bear Island (Norway)

Bear Island (Norwegian: Bjørnøya, ) is the southernmost island of the Norwegian Svalbard archipelago. The island is located in the western part of the Barents Sea, approximately halfway between Spitsbergen and the North Cape.

Bear Island was discovered by the Dutch explorers Willem Barents and Jacob van Heemskerk on June 10, 1596. It was named after a polar bear that was seen swimming nearby. The island was considered terra nullius until the Spitsbergen Treaty of 1920 placed it under Norwegian sovereignty.

Despite its remote location and barren nature, the island has seen commercial activities in past centuries, such as coal mining, fishing and whaling. However, no settlements have lasted more than a few years, and Bear Island is now uninhabited except for personnel working at the island's meteorological station Herwighamna. Along with the adjacent waters, it was declared a nature reserve in 2002.

Read more about Bear Island (Norway):  History, Hydrography, Geography and Climate, Flora and Fauna, Environmental Concerns, Culture

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Bear Island (Norway) - Culture
... BearIsland has a club for nude dippers ("Bjørnøya nakenbadeforening"), with a little over 3,000 members ...

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