Attraction

In general, an attraction draws one object towards another one.A term may have the following specific meanings:

  • In physics, attraction may refer to gravity or to the electromagnetic force
  • Attraction (emotion) or attractiveness
  • Interpersonal attraction, the attraction between people which leads to friendships and romantic relationships
  • Physical attraction, attraction on the basis of beauty
  • Sexual attraction, attraction on the basis of sexual desire
  • Tourist attraction, a place of interest where tourists visit
    • Amusement park attraction
  • Attraction (grammar), the process by which a relative pronoun takes on — that is, is "attracted to" — the case of its antecedent
  • Law of Attraction (New Age), a belief that mental disposition will attract similar results
  • Attraction (horse) (foaled 2001)
  • The Attractions, backing band for Elvis Costello

Other articles related to "attraction":

Saw – The Ride - Other Saw Attractions
... The walk-through attraction is dark throughout and uses lighting, smells, mist and make-up to add effect ... Saw – Movie Bites was a temporary attraction as part of the park's 2009 Halloween 'Fright Nights' event ... The attraction did not return for the 2010 Fright Nights event ...
Lakh Bahosi Sanctuary - Attraction
... A separate lake at nearby Lakh village hosts some similar species, though the relative ecology is somewhat different ... The best time to visit is December to February. ...
Silly Symphony Swings
... Silly Symphony Swings is a "wave swinger" attraction in Paradise Pier, at Disney California Adventure, at the Disneyland Resort in California ... The Band Concert conductor Mickey Mouse conducts the attraction from high atop, synchronized with the music ... part of the 'Silly Symphonies' film series, the name was applied to the attraction due to its apparent symphony storyline ...

Famous quotes containing the word attraction:

    The great attraction of fashion is that it diverted attention from the insoluble problems of beauty and provided an easy way—which money could buy ... to a simply stated, easily reproduced ideal of beauty, however temporary that ideal.
    Theodore Zeldin (b. 1923)

    We should omit a main attraction in these books, if we said nothing of their humor. Of this indispensable pledge of sanity, without some leaven of which the abstruse thinker may justly be suspected of mysticism, fanaticism, or insanity, there is a superabundance in Carlyle.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The satirist is prevented by repulsion from gaining a better knowledge of the world he is attracted to, yet he is forced by attraction to concern himself with the world that repels him.
    Italo Calvino (1923–1985)