Advanced Computing Environment

The Advanced Computing Environment (ACE) was defined by an industry consortium in the early 1990s to be the next generation commodity computing platform, the successor to personal computers based on Intel's 32-bit instruction set architecture. The effort found little support in the market and dissolved due to a lack of sales and infighting within the group.

Read more about Advanced Computing Environment:  ARC, Systems

Other articles related to "computing":

Computing Ordinary Derivatives Using Logarithmic Derivatives
... Instead of computing it directly, we compute its logarithmic derivative ... This technique makes it possible to compute ƒ' by computing the logarithmic derivative of each factor, summing, and multiplying by ƒ ...
Human-centered Computing
... Human-centered computing (HCC) is an emerging, interdisciplinary academic field broadly concerned with computing and computational artifacts as they relate to ... Researchers and practitioners who affiliate themselves with human-centered computing usually come from one or more of the following disciplines computer science, sociology ... The term "human-centered computing" was first defined by Rob Kling and Susan Leigh Star in the paper "Human Centered Systems in the Perspective of Organizational and Social ...
Dvorak Awards
... The Dvorak Awards for Excellence in Communication were established by computing columnist John C ... businesses both inside and outside the computing industry also assumed sponsorship ... Dvorak judged the awards in collaboration with a committee of computing industry experts who were recruited annually ...

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