• (noun): (mathematics) the number of significant figures given in a number.
    Example: "The atomic clock enabled scientists to measure time with much greater accuracy"
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on accuracy:

Continuous Emissions Monitoring System - Quality Assurance
... Accuracy of the system is demonstrated in several ways ... The percent accuracy can vary, but most fall between 2.5% and 5% ... This testing is referred to as a Relative Accuracy Test Audit (RATA) ...
Sacred Name Bibles - Historical Background - Accuracy or Popularity
... using local names for the creator or highest deity, conceptualizing accuracy as semantic rather than phonetic ... of Sacred Name Bibles suggests that phonetic accuracy is not considered to be of importance by mainstream Bible translators ...
Lisa Olsen - Career
... Olsen won the Gold Medal in Women's Individual Accuracy at the XIX World Parachuting Championships in Sweden in 1988 ... and Bev Watson, won the Silver Medal in Women's Team Accuracy at the XVI World Parachuting Championships in Czechoslovakia, after which they posed in bikinis in a 1982 issue of CANPARA (Canadian Parachutist) ... She also served as Chief Judge in Style Accuracy at the 2004 US National Skydiving Championships ...
Shanks Transformation - Example
... The partial sum has only one digit accuracy, while six-figure accuracy requires summing about 400,000 terms ... partial sums and Shanks transformation results, clearly showing the improved accuracy and convergence rate 0 4.00000000 — — — 1 2.66666667 3.16666667 — — 2 3.46666667 3.13333333 3.14210526 ...

More definitions of "accuracy":

  • (noun): The quality of nearness to the truth or the true value.
    Example: "He was beginning to doubt the accuracy of his compass"
    Synonyms: truth

Famous quotes containing the word accuracy:

    The child who has been taught to make an accurate elevation, plan, and section of a pint pot has had an admirable training in accuracy of eye and hand.
    Thomas Henry Huxley (1825–95)

    In everything from athletic ability to popularity to looks, brains, and clothes, children rank themselves against others. At this age [7 and 8], children can tell you with amazing accuracy who has the coolest clothes, who tells the biggest lies, who is the best reader, who runs the fastest, and who is the most popular boy in the third grade.
    Stanley I. Greenspan (20th century)

    U.S. international and security policy ... has as its primary goal the preservation of what we might call “the Fifth Freedom,” understood crudely but with a fair degree of accuracy as the freedom to rob, to exploit and to dominate, to undertake any course of action to ensure that existing privilege is protected and advanced.
    Noam Chomsky (b. 1928)