Projectile

A projectile is any object projected into space (empty or not) by the exertion of a force. Although any object in motion through space (for example a thrown baseball) may be referred to as a projectile, the term more commonly refers to a weapon.

For details of the mathematics surrounding projectile trajectory, see equations of motion.

Read more about Projectile:  Motive Force, Delivery Projectiles, Kinetic Projectiles, Wired Projectiles, Typical Projectile Speeds

Other articles related to "projectile, projectiles":

Steam Cannon
... A steam cannon is a cannon that launches a projectile using only heat and water ... the tube would be capped and the other loaded with a projectile ... enough temperature, a small amount of water would be injected in behind the projectile ...
Sectional Density - Use in Ballistics
... The sectional density of a projectile can be employed in two area of ballistics ... when the sectional density of a projectile is divided by its form factor it yields the projectile's ballistic coefficient ... Within terminal ballistics, the sectional density of a projectile is one of the determining factors for projectile penetration ...
ATMOS 2000 - Overview
... can be achieved, using Extended Range Full-Bore - Base Bleed (ERFB-BB) projectile, 30 km firing the NATO L15 High Explosive (HE) projectile and 24.5 km firing the ... The ATMOS 2000 carries a total of 155 ... mm projectiles and associated charges and can be operated by a 4 man crew, consisting of two loaders positioned one ...
Typical Projectile Speeds
... also Orders of magnitude (speed) and Muzzle velocity Projectile Speed Specific kinetic energy (J/kg) (m/s) (km/h) (ft/s) (mph) Object falling 1 m (in vacuum, at ... vehicle Up to 4,000 Up to 14,000 Up to 13,000 Up to 9,000 Up to 8,000,000 projectile of a light gas gun Up to 7,000 Up to 25,000 Up to 23,000 Up to 16,000 Up to 24,000,000 Satellite ...
Lower Georges Heights Commanding Position - History
... were “muzzle loading”, this meant that the explosive charge and projectile had to be loaded into the barrel from the same end ... these cannons were replaced in 1889 by much lighter weight guns that could fire an 80 pound (36kg) projectile for 3,170 yards (3,000 metres) ... were “breech loading” which meant that the explosive charge and projectile were to be loaded into the rear of the cannon ...