2003–04 South-West Indian Ocean Cyclone Season

2003–04 South-West Indian Ocean Cyclone Season

The 2003-04 South-West Indian Ocean cyclone season was an annual event of tropical cyclone formation. It started on November 15, 2003 and ended on April 30, 2004. For Mauritius and the Seychelles, the season continued until May 15. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the basin, which is west of 90°E and south of the Equator. Tropical cyclones in this basin are monitored by the Regional Specialised Meteorological Centre in Réunion.

Read more about 2003–04 South-West Indian Ocean Cyclone SeasonStorm Names

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2003–04 South-West Indian Ocean Cyclone Season - Storm Names
... moderate tropical storm status west of 55°E, then the Sub-regional Tropical Cyclone Advisory Centre in Madagascar assigns the appropriate name to the storm ... reaches moderate tropical storm status between 55°E and 90°E, then the Sub-regional Tropical Cyclone Advisory Centre in Mauritius assigns the appropriate name to the storm ...

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    To the Ocean now I fly,
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    Up in the broad fields of the sky:
    John Milton (1608–1674)

    The Jew is neither a newcomer nor an alien in this country or on this continent; his Americanism is as original and ancient as that of any race or people with the exception of the American Indian and other aborigines. He came in the caravels of Columbus, and he knocked at the gates of New Amsterdam only thirty-five years after the Pilgrim Fathers stepped ashore on Plymouth Rock.
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    At this season I seldom had a visitor. When the snow lay deepest no wanderer ventured near my house for a week or fortnight at a time, but there I lived as snug as a meadow mouse.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The Westerly Wind asserting his sway from the south-west quarter is often like a monarch gone mad, driving forth with wild imprecations the most faithful of his courtiers to shipwreck, disaster, and death.
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