What is take note?

  • (verb): Observe with care or pay close attention to.
    Example: "Take note of this chemical reaction"
    Synonyms: note, observe

Some articles on notes, note:

History of Note Names
... first fifteen letters of the alphabet to signify the notes of the two-octave range that was in use at the time ... When the compass of used notes was extended down by one note, to a G, it was given the Greek G (Γ), gamma ... gamme is derived, and the English word gamut, from "Gamma-Ut", the lowest note in Medieval music notation.) The remaining five notes of the chromatic scale (the black keys on a piano keyboard ...
Neume - Solesmes Notation
... Gregorian chant, using varying styles of square-note neumes, circulated throughout the Catholic Church for centuries ... many of the chants, and developed a standardized form of the square-note notation which was adopted by the Catholic Church and is still in use in publications such as the Liber ... As a general rule, the notes of a single neume are never sung to more than one syllable all three pitches of a three-note neume, for example, must all be sung on the same syllable ...
Neume - Illustrations - Interpretive Marks
... subsidiary accent when there are five or more notes in a neume group Horizontal episema (horizontal stroke) Used over a single note or a group of notes (as shown ... Liquescent neume (small note) Can occur on almost any type of neume usually associated with certain letter combinations such as double consonants, consonant pairs ...

Famous quotes containing the word note:

    In our Mechanics’ Fair, there must be not only bridges, ploughs, carpenter’s planes, and baking troughs, but also some few finer instruments,—rain-gauges, thermometers, and telescopes; and in society, besides farmers, sailors, and weavers, there must be a few persons of purer fire kept specially as gauges and meters of character; persons of a fine, detecting instinct, who note the smallest accumulations of wit and feeling in the bystander.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    The note of the white-throated sparrow, a very inspiriting but almost wiry sound, was first heard in the morning, and with this all the woods rang. This was the prevailing bird in the northern part of Maine. The forest generally was alive with them at this season, and they were proportionally numerous and musical about Bangor. They evidently breed in that State.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)