Ulysses Pact - Origin of The Name

Origin of The Name

The term refers to the pact that Ulysses (Greek name "Ὀδυσσεύς", Odysseus) made with his men as they approached the Sirens. Ulysses wanted to hear the Sirens' song although he knew that doing so would render him incapable of rational thought. He put wax in his men's ears so that they could not hear, and had them tie him to the mast so that he could not jump into the sea. He ordered them not to change course under any circumstances, and to keep their swords upon him to attack him if he should break free of his bonds.

Upon hearing the Sirens' song, Ulysses was driven temporarily insane and struggled with all of his might to break free so that he might join the Sirens, which would have meant his death.

Read more about this topic:  Ulysses Pact

Other articles related to "origin of the name, the name":

Stochastic Geometry - Origin of The Name
... The name appears to have been coined by David Kendall and Klaus Krickeberg while preparing for a June 1969 Oberwolfach workshop, though antecedents for the theory stretch ...
São Gotardo - Economic Activities - Origin of The Name
... The name is inspired by Joaquim Gotardo de Lima who arrived in the region in 1836 with his family and settled on a cattle ranch which later developed into a small ... Confusão, after a local ranch, was raised to a district with the name of São Sebastião do Pouso Alegre ... Later the name was changed to pay homage to the founder, who unexpectedly gained sainthood in the new name ...

Famous quotes containing the words origin of the, origin of and/or origin:

    In the woods in a winter afternoon one will see as readily the origin of the stained glass window, with which Gothic cathedrals are adorned, in the colors of the western sky seen through the bare and crossing branches of the forest.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Someone had literally run to earth
    In an old cellar hole in a byroad
    The origin of all the family there.
    Thence they were sprung, so numerous a tribe
    That now not all the houses left in town
    Made shift to shelter them without the help
    Of here and there a tent in grove and orchard.
    Robert Frost (1874–1963)

    Our theism is the purification of the human mind. Man can paint, or make, or think nothing but man. He believes that the great material elements had their origin from his thought.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)